Superfood: Edamame

Posted in Nutrition

As all vegetables and fruits they are a great aid for weight loss and for maintain healthy energy levels.
One cup has about 20 grams of plant protein, with lots of fiber, folate and phytosterols that help lower bad cholesterol. Rich in omega 3 fats the plan is also rich in Vitamin C, E nd B-6.

It’s gluten-free, cholesterol-free, and low in calories. In addition to being a welcome source of protein, Edamame offers iron and calcium. They can be eaten plain as a snack or used without the pod, sautéed and sprinkled in a salad like a bean, mashed into a paste, cooked into rice dishes or steamed and served as a side to sushi dishes. It can easily be used in soups or stews - and is extremely versatile.

We’ve selected a special recipe by Stacey from goodnessis.com that will bring all the fresh green, tender and buttery flavour to your meal.

Coconut Curry with Edamame

Most grocery stores sell frozen edamame that simply needs to be defrosted. For the majority of recipes, frozen edamame work just fine and are much easier to use. Fresh edamame are fairly hard to find but you may get lucky in an Asian grocery. If you do happen to come across fresh edamame, then just boil them for 5 to 10 minutes or until tender. You don't want to overcook them as they will become mushy, you still want a little bite to them.

I have chosen to use frozen edamame in this aromatic coconut curry and can easily be replaced with sweet peas when edamame is out of season. When preparing this dish I try to keep the greens bursting with colour, flavour and nutrients by giving them very little cooking time and adding them at the very end just before serving. In summer I like to add a whole ear of corn, cut in three pieces, the vegetable can be swapped around to whatever is in season.

It is important to use whole spices and grind yourself as this adds the depth and aromatic flavours to the curry.

Recipe:

Serves 4

  • 1 heaped tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 heaped tsp coriander seeds
  • ¼ heaped tsp whole black peppercorns
  • ½ heaped tsp turmeric powder
  • 2 Tblsp coconut oil/ghee
  • 1 long dried chilli (seeds removed and torn into 3 pieces)
  • 2-inch/30g knob fresh ginger, peeled and cut into thin slices
  • 4 large shavings from the peel of a lemon
  • 3 sticks/160g celery/ large fennel
  • 1 medium/200g sweet potato/pumpkin, peeled, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 2 medium/180g potatoes, peeled, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 1 medium/80g carrot, peeled, halved lengthwise,cut into 1 - inch chunks
  • A wedge/60g roughly chopped cabbage
  • 1 (400ml) tin coconut milk
  • 3 cups water
  • ½ tamarind paste/squeeze fresh lemon juice
  • 1 ½ heaped teaspoon jaggery/ sugar
  • 1 tsp rock salt
  • 1 cup frozen/fresh edamame beans
  • 2 handfuls/40g kale - remove thicker stems, small leaves whole and bigger leaves torn in half
  • ½ cup roughly chopped fresh coriander

Preparation:

In a small pan dry roast cumin & coriander seeds, whole peppercorns, once fragrant 45 - 60 seconds, transfer to a mortar. Cool, then use the pestle to crush the spices into a coarse powder. Add the turmeric powder and set aside.

Heat 2 Tblsp coconut oil, in a large pot, add the chilli and saute for 30 seconds. Stir in the ginger, lemon peel, celery; cook for a few minutes, and then add the carrots, potato & sweet potato,ground spices to the pot with 3 cups boiling water, bring to the boil, then turn down the heat and allow to simmer, uncovered for 10 minutes, next add the cabbage, and simmer for 5 more minutes or until the potatoes are soft.

Stir in the tamarind paste, jaggery/sugar, and season with salt. Turn off the heat and stir in the edamame beans, kale and coriander leaves, cover and allow to sit for five minutes - Keeping the greens vibrant and firm. Taste and check for seasoning. Serve with noodles or rice, and garnish with sprigs of fresh coriander, bean sprouts, steamed kale leaves and a few rounds of fresh ground pepper.
If not serving immediately, keep the edamame beans & greens aside. When ready to serve reheat the curry, adding the greens, and simmering until tender.

Posted in Nutrition